Feb 9, 2007

From the Disney Art Corner: "How to draw..."


I've had this for years, though I can't remember its exact provenance. I think it dates from the early 1960s, and was sold at the Disneyland Art Corner--the all too brief animation area of Tomorrowland, where cels from "Peter Pan" and "Sleeping Beauty" were scattered a foot deep in a bin for tourists to paw through, priced a buck or so apiece--while earlier, more valuable artwork from "Bambi", "Fantasia", etc. were matted and framed on the wall for a few dollars more.
Where'd I leave that time machine parked again?

The drawings inside are pretty much in the Walter Foster mold, clearly done by a studio veteran--a little staid for my taste, but miles better than what's usually done in this sort of book from the period. And thanks to Pete Docter, here's why--the artist was Paul Carlson, a Disney man with a great provenance. Pete was able to locate him and interview him at length when researching his article on John Sibley(which was published in the latest issue of Animation Blast, and is a must-read).
Pete writes:

"The books were put together by Paul
Carlson, who was an assistant to Marc Davis and Eric Cleworth back in
the 50's and 60's. He's a great guy with some amazing Disney stories.
Anyway Paul told me he consulted Sibley for the "How to Draw Goofy"
book, Bill Justice for Chip and Dale, Bob Carlson for Donald, and
Lounsberry for Mickey."


[There's a bit more about Carlson, along with a picture taken just last year, at this archived ASIFA-Hollywood page]

And lastly, a word to aspiring animators from the man himself--as valid today as in 1961:

7 comments:

Julián höek said...

amazing stuff!! would you scan it and post it all???
please please please please please!!

thankss

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

I second Julian! Please, please post the whole book!

MrBubblesNSunshine said...

Beautiful!

And could you build a time-machine while you are at it?!?

Matterhorn1959 said...

The art corner also sold an animation kit with an animation light board, paper, drawing guides, and more. Once you had completed the animation, you would send your drawings in to be photographed and sent back to you along with the film. Pretty cool for a kid entranced with animation. There is also a Chip and Dale and a Tips for Animation book.

tygriffin said...

"Remember that while copying is often helpful in learning to draw, the true artist must do original work."

Excellent advice. Thanks for posting! :)

t

Chana said...

This is great info to know.

Christopher Sobieniak said...

Once you had completed the animation, you would send your drawings in to be photographed and sent back to you along with the film. Pretty cool for a kid entranced with animation. There is also a Chip and Dale and a Tips for Animation book.

If only I could've been there and tried that!