Oct 17, 2006

How to draw really well.


from David Pimentel's moleskinie notebook
What's the most surefire way to improve your drawing chops?

Drawing. All the time. No matter how good you already may be.
This guy slays me:


He draws in the car, in restaurants, at lunch, at break--you name it. Everything's an opportunity to capture something. Walt Stanchfield must be beaming somewhere.

I've worked around him for a little over two years now, and in that short time--frankly, at times week to week--I've seen leaps and bounds where I wouldn't have thought things could get any better, which along with all the other guys around here toting sketchbooks is the proof in the pudding. This is good advice I kick myself about oh, every 20 minutes or so.

So grab that sketchbook--and make sure you've got it on you at all times.

7 comments:

Matt Williames said...

here, here! great post!

Jeremy Bernstein said...

I just checked them out. Geez...I need to draw more! That kid running is brilliant.

Kevin Langley said...

Great post, that's my biggest problem. I don't draw enough, yet by some miracle I expect improvement.

David Germain said...

What's the most surefire way to improve your drawing chops?

Drawing. All the time. No matter how good you already may be.


Well, that and picking up tips and tutorials every once in a while from either school, books, etc. Otherwise you're just spinning your wheels making the same mistakes over and over.

antikewl said...

David has a good point. I saw a huge improvement after starting to research on the net. If I hadn't stumbled across John K's lessons, the Walt Stanchfield notes, Glenn Vilppu's book, and the comments and information provided by very good artists in the industry (yourself included!) I wouldn't have made anywhere near as much progress as I would without guidance.

kevin said...

Great post Jenny - it reminds me to draw draw draw.

And thanks for the added link too.
Great company to be among.

B. Durbin said...

I don't draw nearly as much as I should, yet I find that I improve. It probably doesn't hurt AT ALL that my day job involves extensive Photoshop work, or in examining photo portraits. (I have learned so very much about the human face while retouching zits... :) )